Feb 02 2014

BPH and Prostate Cancer

A few days ago at my local health food store I was in the checkout line and saw the latest issue of "What Doctors Don't Tell You". On the cover was the headline of an article, "For men only - Why you don't need prostate surgery". So I snagged it. I have learned more than a bit about the prostate in my travels through pegging paradise. Could someone finally be offering valuable information to the general public about prostate health and care? I couldn't wait to read it.

Upon arriving home, I whipped up a quick lunch and sat down to eat and read; my usual multi-tasking. When I turned to the article, I saw an additional word they left out of the title on the front page, cancer. "So you think you need...surgery for prostate cancer".

Disappointed. I was hoping they would be addressing the type of prostate surgery that is done to relieve symptoms of BPH (Benign Protastatic Hyperplasia). TURP - Transurethral resection of the prostate - is a surgical treatment for BPH. So imagine my surprise to find TURP listed for surgical options for prostate cancer. What? The article didn't mention BPH at all. I sent them this letter:

Editor - In your article about prostate cancer surgery, you listed TURP – Transurethral resection of the prostate. This surgery is not used for prostate cancer, it is used to relieve symptoms of BPH - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. BPH is one of the most common diseases found in aging men and presents with symptoms of a variety of urinary difficulties. The ureter tube runs through the middle of the prostate gland and when the gland swells it can cause urinary problems.

An extensive study of over 3 million men in Denmark examined the relationship between BPH and prostate cancer and found clinical BPH was associated with a two- to three-fold increased risk of prostate cancer. Although they found a correlation, they did not find causation. Not every man who has BPH will get prostate cancer and not every man who has prostate cancer first has BPH. Still, optimal prostate heath is desirable for the lowest risk of prostate cancer.

Regarding BPH and in keeping with the theme of your magazine/e-zine, another thing doctors will not tell you about is a study published in the Open Urology and Nephrology Journal that examines the use of a prostate massage device designed to emulate a digital prostate massage for effectiveness in relieving symptoms of BPH. The two year study consisted of 154 men and over 90% reported improvements in their lower urinary tract symptoms from both BPH and chronic prostatitis when using the prostate massage device.

For those men suffering from BPH, wouldn’t it be better to try a prostate massage device first rather than undergoing a surgery (TURP) to basically cut or burn out part of their prostate?

Sincerely,
Ruby Ryder

Now...pegging is certainly one way to encourage prostate health, right? But I wasn't going to completely eliminate my chances of having my letter published!  Pegging would be great for prostate health. But for those of you not fortunate enough to have a pegging partner, another method is the Aneros device I referred to in my letter. It is specifically designed to emulate a prostate massage. Plus, it will do you the dual task of encouraging a healthy prostate as well as likely providing you with a lot of lovely prostate-induced pleasure.

In my travels I have encountered a number of men who came to pegging through the use of an Aneros device. They solved their BPH, discovered how much pleasure prostate stimulation can offer and wanted to involve their partners in the fun.

In closing, gentlemen...please allow me to posit the following:

Whether through pegging or solo prostate massage, this is likely the most fun you will ever have staying healthy!

 

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